Blog Post Q1 - 2013 - Spriter
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Published on 2013/01/17	 by Denis in Creative Photography, Macro Photography
http://denisgrenier.com/Blog/2013/01/creative-photography-12/
In Macro Photography, depth of field is a challenge.  As the magnification increase, the depth of field decrease and the corresponding sharp zone is thick as a razor blade.  This in turn creates opportunity for nice background blur.

Creative Photography: getting the most of Macro Photography Depth of Field.
In the summer of 2009, every Saturday morning, I was like a thief going through my garden with scissors frantically cutting flowers.  Most of the time I did not really looked at my precious findings until I was back in my macro studio.

I learned a lot about composition, texture, colors and lighting in 2009.  I put my Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens at full magnification of 1:1 on my crop sensor body and slowly rotate the flowers to find a nice composition.

I found nice flowers!  I also had a lot of surprised doing so.  On this early June morning, these physocarpus diabolo flowers were different.  The dew point created all these very little water bubbles on a flower that is so small!  This is full one to one magnification.  You can imagine how surprised I was to see this through the lens!  You can’t get this by spraying water!


Physocarpus Diabolo hanging on my Wall!
In Macro Photography it is extremely difficult to see the result by looking at something with our own eyes.  The depth of field is not the same, the details are not there.  Putting the camera on live view and slowly rotating the flowers while looking at the viewfinder was such a discovery for me.

In this image I deliberately chose to keep an open space on the right side.  I also ensure that the open flowers were leading the viewer from the lower left to the upper right of the frame.  The open space is acting like a wall, bringing back the viewer within the frame.  The small clumps of unopened flowers served as a lead-in the future of this group.  I like to keep my audience to wonder about the past and the future when they look at a picture.

I don’t think that having all flowers at a perfect stage of maturity is healthy in an artistic flower picture.  When I cut this small clump of flower from the physocarpus, I had very little hope.  This shrub is not really known for its flower.  Today, this picture is showing in my bedroom.  Printed and frame at 20 x 30 inches it is great!

About yourself, are you venturing in Macro Photography?  Do you get surprised by the beauty of ordinary plants?

Published on 2013/01/17 by Denis in Creative Photography, Macro Photography
http://denisgrenier.com/Blog/2013/01/creative-photography-12/
In Macro Photography, depth of field is a challenge. As the magnification increase, the depth of field decrease and the corresponding sharp zone is thick as a razor blade. This in turn creates opportunity for nice background blur.

Creative Photography: getting the most of Macro Photography Depth of Field.
In the summer of 2009, every Saturday morning, I was like a thief going through my garden with scissors frantically cutting flowers. Most of the time I did not really looked at my precious findings until I was back in my macro studio.

I learned a lot about composition, texture, colors and lighting in 2009. I put my Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens at full magnification of 1:1 on my crop sensor body and slowly rotate the flowers to find a nice composition.

I found nice flowers! I also had a lot of surprised doing so. On this early June morning, these physocarpus diabolo flowers were different. The dew point created all these very little water bubbles on a flower that is so small! This is full one to one magnification. You can imagine how surprised I was to see this through the lens! You can’t get this by spraying water!


Physocarpus Diabolo hanging on my Wall!
In Macro Photography it is extremely difficult to see the result by looking at something with our own eyes. The depth of field is not the same, the details are not there. Putting the camera on live view and slowly rotating the flowers while looking at the viewfinder was such a discovery for me.

In this image I deliberately chose to keep an open space on the right side. I also ensure that the open flowers were leading the viewer from the lower left to the upper right of the frame. The open space is acting like a wall, bringing back the viewer within the frame. The small clumps of unopened flowers served as a lead-in the future of this group. I like to keep my audience to wonder about the past and the future when they look at a picture.

I don’t think that having all flowers at a perfect stage of maturity is healthy in an artistic flower picture. When I cut this small clump of flower from the physocarpus, I had very little hope. This shrub is not really known for its flower. Today, this picture is showing in my bedroom. Printed and frame at 20 x 30 inches it is great!

About yourself, are you venturing in Macro Photography? Do you get surprised by the beauty of ordinary plants?

500D PhotoThingsFlowerMacro PhotoTypePhysocarpusRedWhite Couleur